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American Eskimo Dog (Puppies, Rescue, Temperament, Life Span, Price)

American Eskimo Dog

The American Eskimo dog breed is a big bundle of fur and fun. It’s a lovable, beautiful dog that has a rather large following and can be found throughout the country. But how tall and how heavy can they get? What is the American Eskimo dog life span and price and how easy is it to buy them as puppies or to rescue them as adults? Those are the questions we will ask and answer in this guide to American Eskimo dogs.

American Eskimo Dog Life Span: 12 to 15 Years
American Eskimo Dog Price: $600 to $1,000
American Eskimo Dog Height: From 9 Inches (for Toy) to 20 Inches (Standard)
Other Names: Eskimo Spitz; American Spitz; German Spitz

American Eskimo Dogs: Basics

This breed of dog was very popular during the 1930s and 1940s, when they were often used during performing circus shows. They have also been good companions and very loyal dogs, and when it was discovered that they could be easily trained, they were seen as the perfect fit for this career.

It didn’t hurt that the American Eskimo dog is also a very attractive breed of dog and therefore a perfect crowd pleaser.

American Eskimo Dog Size

There are three main types of American Eskimo dog. These are “Toy”, “Miniature” and “Standard”, with different sizes and weight expectations for all of them (going from lowest to highest in that order).

Typically, a Toy American Eskimo dog can be as small as 6 pounds and as big as 12 pounds. A Standard American Eskimo dog on the other hand can weigh as much as 40 pounds in a healthy state (obviously, obese dogs can weigh more) and can be as tall as 20 inches. As you can see, there is a rather significant different between these two types, with the “miniature” essentially splitting the difference.

American Eskimo Dog Price

American Eskimo Dog Price

So, how much can you expect to pay for a American Eskimo dog? Well, while this is a pure breed that doesn’t come cheap, it is not one of the most expensive breeds either. In fact, you can typically find one of these puppies for between $600 and $1,000, providing you buy from a breeder and not from a pet store.

American Eskimo Dog for Sale

We wouldn’t advise buying from a pet store anyway, even if price wasn’t an issue. You want your money to go to someone who loves and cares for their dogs and doesn’t just see them as a profit that they can lock away in a cage until a customer is ready to buy. There are no shortage of American Eskimo dog breeders in the US. You might not find one in your local area at the time of looking, but if you put feelers out, if you are prepared to travel and if you have a little patience, then it could be matter of time before someone has some American Eskimo Dog puppies for sale.

American Eskimo Dog Health Problems

This is a very hardy breed of dog. As mentioned above, the American Eskimo dog life span is between 12 and 15 years, which is very good for a pure breed like this. However, there are some health issues.

The most common issue that American Eskimo dogs face is obesity. They can be lazy and, like all dogs, they can also be greedy. This means they can rapidly put on weight. Fortunately, this is easily fixed. Just make sure that you monitor how much they eat, keep a close check on the amount of treats and energy-dense foods that you give them, and purchase special dog food if needed.

Obesity is not the only health issue that American Eskimo dogs face. There are also joint and bone issues, as well as vision problems. These issues include Luxating Patella and Hip Dysplasia, as well as Progressive Retinal Atrophy. Dental issues are not uncommon either, although these may not present in a dog that has been fed on a proper diet; and they can also develop allergies rather easily.

American Eskimo Dog Rescue

It is rare for pure breeds to end up in rescue shelters, especially when they are highly sought-after “show” breeds like the American Eskimo Dog. However, this is not completely unheard of. If you ask around at your local shelters then you might be able to find one. But you should think twice about leaving your details with them and asking them to contact you whenever a American Eskimo dog arrives.

Shelters want people who are there to love and care for a dog, not someone who has a specific dog in mind and is only interested in acquiring that dog cheaply. It’s only right, because these are animals, not toys. But at the same time, we can understand how someone can be in this position—wanting a American Eskimo Dog rescue—without any ill intentions. In such cases though, you’ll just have to do the leg work yourself.

Don’t limit yourself to your own city either. There are many thousands of dogs waiting new owners in most states. If you start looking elsewhere, taking in the shelters that are within your state and not just your city, your odds of finding a American Eskimo Dog rescue will be quite high.

American Eskimo Dog Puppies

American Eskimo Dog Lifespan

If you are buying a American Eskimo puppy then you should make sure they have received a full check-up by a qualified veterinarian. They should be looking for potential health issues, including ones that are present right now and ones that might develop in the future.

Parentage is important, as many of the health issues associated with the American Eskimo are genetic. But because this is a pure breed of dog, even if the parentage is fairly clean health-wise, it still doesn’t mean that you’re in the clear. Those issues may be dormant in their genes and they could still develop them even if their parents do not.

As well as the proper checks, a vet will also make sure that they have received the necessary inoculations, while giving them a check-over and reporting on any issues that need to be monitored. You’re going to pay a lot of money for this breed of dog and you’re going to be responsible for a living thing that could be a part of your life for the next 15 years. So, make sure no stone is left unturned with regards to health.